2018-12-05T21:00:00+00:00
Live in Omaha!

Second Leg - Omaha, United States

56518

Live Blog

1850: THAT IS A WRAP, OMAHA!

It's been a fabulous week here at the Ralston Arena. We had finalists from six different countries, winners from three different continents, new names on the trophies and many new friends made. Fancy doing it all again? Well, we'll see you in Jonkoping, Sweden, at the end of January! For now, from us here in wintry Nebraska, it's adios.

1832: HERE'S SOME SHUSTER REACTION FOR Y'ALL

"What a great tournament," says John Shuster in the mixed zone. "There was some great curling out here and some really great teams. I’m really proud to get a win any time you have your country on your back.

"It was a lot of fun [to play in front of home crowd] - they were into it. For me, it’s always been easier every time we have lots of fans in the stands and we definitely got that feeling here this week, especially this afternoon."

On Niklas Edin's decision to surrender a point and keep the hammer for the final end, Shuster said: "We would have done the exact same thing. With the way curling is this day and age with the five rock rule, you have a much better chance at winning when you’re down two with the hammer rather than tied up.

"I hope that we get as good of ice [in the Grand Final in Beijing] and we go and play as good as here and take home a Grand Final for the United States."

1823: A FEW THOUGHTS FROM NIKLAS EDIN FIRST...

On that decision to go 3-1 down and keep the hammer in the last end: "If you take one there, you’re toast, you’ve got five per cent chance to win the game. It’s a difficult call to give up one there, but it’s a bad situation and I obviously had no choice.

"It’s always nice to play a good team, especially with their home-crowd too, you get some more spectators coming. I’m a little annoyed we couldn’t play better in this game and give it a better chance."

1753: VICTORY FOR TEAM SHUSTER!!

Two United States stones scoring in the house, but Niklas Edin's second-last shot is a beauty, just nudging past an American stone on its way to a soft-weight take-out which comes to rest by the button. But here's Shuster, can he take it out? YES! United States are left lying three and Sweden are run out of stones. The host nation take the men's title with a 3-1 victory.

HERE'S THE MOMENT OF VICTORY FOR TEAM SHUSTER
1749

Shot, Chris Plys! Sweden have three well spread guards but there's beautiful curl on that to nestle it next to another American shot stone to lie two. Plys' next shot is an attempted hit and roll but he can't quite hold the shooter. Here's Eriksson now, but his draw is light... this looks ominous for Sweden...

1738: INTERESTING MOVE BY EDIN...

...Very interesting indeed. With two American scoring stones on either side of the house, Edin could have drawn to the button for one to level up at 2-2 going into the final end. But no. He opts to take out one of the United States stones, preferring to go 3-1 down and keep the hammer in the eighth. Bold move. Will it pay off?

1724: UNITED STATES TAKE THE LEAD...

...but it's one they take rather reluctantly. Again it's a very cagey end which ends up with rocks on either side of the house, leaving Shuster little other option with his last stone than to draw into the centre for one, handing the hammer back to the Swedish vikings. United States 2-1 Sweden. Two ends to come.

1711: THE MAGIC IS NOT QUITE FLOWING FOR EDIN

Six shots each down, and Sweden have three stones spread in a wide triangle inside the house... Chris Plys take out the one at the front, then... oh dear, what has Niklas Edin done here? He's taken out his own shot stone! He looks to the roof and grimaces. Shuster draws to leave United States lying two, and Edin has little choice but to draw to the button for one, surrendering the hammer. It's 1-1 after five ends.

1652: IT'S TIIIIGHT!

Nice double by Eriksson and then a delicious hit and roll by Edin leaves the world champions with one on the edge of an otherwise deserted house. That's taken out easily enough by Shuster so Edin, once again, rolls out for the third blank end of a very low-scoring opening half. United States lead 1-0.

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